Open Letter to U.S. Education Secretary King Who Says Homeschoolers Would Be Better Off in Public Schools

Dear Secretary King,

Earlier this week, you stated you were concerned many homeschoolers were not getting the socialization and educational opportunities as their peers.

You must be unfamiliar with contemporary homeschooling. Not only are many homeschool families excelling in academics but are also on the cutting edge of 21st-century education. In fact, the education world could learn a lot if they spent some time studying what contemporary homeschoolers are creating. In many cases, it is educational entrepreneurship at its finest! Regarding socialization, I find the opportunities for homeschoolers as vastly superior to those in conventional classrooms.

Let me break down and address your reported concerns:

  • You worry that, in a lot of cases, students who are homeschooled are not getting the kind of the breadth of instruction experience they would get in school.

     

We are able to provide our kids with truly customized, high-quality educations. We don’t use a one-size-fits-all curriculum, and we aren’t bogged down by hierarchies and bureaucracies to make change. We don’t teach to the middle or to a test. I never planned to homeschool but had to pull my son from public school because he was so far ahead of his peers. He was bored, and our local public school in an upper-middle-class area was not able to provide adequate rigor or challenge.

There is a large and impressive ecosystem in place for homeschoolers to take academic and enrichment classes. Some classes my kids , currently ages 6-10 years old, have taken with their homeschool friends over the past several years include physics, chemistry, public speaking,  NASA engineering, art, Spanish, aviation, Meet the Great Composers, chess, engineering structures, Lego Writing Club, cooking, botany and violin. In my view, our kids are exposed to so much more and in a much more enjoyable way than their conventionally-schooled counterparts.

  • They’re also not getting the opportunity to build relationships with peers unless their parents are very intentional about it.

I love the way my kids are socialized with our homeschool friends. They are not confined to the same desks, playground and cafeteria  day-after-day. Instead, they are often out in nature enjoying the freedom and purity of those landscapes together. Other times they are interacting in places as diverse as museums,  nature centers, restaurants, galleries, workshops, performing arts theaters, farms, planetariums,  and more. This stimulates tremendous creative interaction amongst the homeschoolers.

They are more actively engaged in conversation, thought, movement and play with friends. Their friendships are strengthened as they learn and play together in a wide variety of interactive environments. This is in stark contrast to the humdrum of being in the same classroom with the same teacher in the same desk each day.

Additionally, homeschooled kids build relationships with peers of a wide age range. Sal Khan, founder of Khan Academy, wrote in The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined:

 “There is nothing natural about segregating kids by age. That isn’t how families work; it isn’t what the world looks like; and it runs counter to the way that kids have learned and socialized for most of human history…..As anyone who’s ever spent time around children can tell you, both younger and older kids benefit when different ages mix. The older ones take responsibility for the younger ones. The younger ones look up to and emulate the older ones.  Everyone seems to act more mature. Both younger and older rise to the occasion. Take away the mix of ages and everybody loses something. “–From The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined by Sal Khan

 

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  • Students who are homeschooled are not getting the kind of “rapid instructional experience” they would get in school.

I don’t know exactly what you mean by this. One of my friends, who is a former science teacher, replied to your comment, “That just means they go so fast and shallow that many kids don’t get it, and the others don’t care about it.” The typical homeschooler takes a different approach. We go deep into subjects. The lifestyle of learning in the homeschool community is a beautiful thing. It goes beyond our academics and can be found in the vacations we take, types of birthday parties we have, weekend activities and more.  Two of the most important skills of a 21st-century education are curiosity and a love of learning. If you spend time in the homeschool community,  you will see children who are frequently out in the world joyfully learning in a variety of environments from people who are passionate about their field and craft.

Also, a large chunk of homeschool families have at least one parent who is currently or was a teacher. This really should raise some eyebrows as to what is going on in public education when so many who have taught in the classroom have decided they can do better by taking them out of the system.  A veteran public school teacher with decades of experience is the person who really encouraged me to pull my son from public school and homeschool him.

  • They’re often not getting those relationships with teachers and mentors other than their parents. You worry whether home school students are getting the range of opportunities we hope for all kids.

Homeschoolers are able to get their academic work done in about half the time of their conventionally-schooled peers. This gives them far more time to be out in the world engaged in their passions with mentors. If they love birding then they can volunteer at the Audubon Society and learn from the naturalists there. If they are passionate about fossils then they can volunteer with a paleontologist. My homeschooled cousin is the youngest docent at our local aquarium. At just 10 years-old, she leads talks throughout the aquarium for visitors.

 

Additionally, there is a huge infrastructure of classes for homeschoolers. Homeschool parents are educational facilitators for their kids and often sign their kids up for classes. They have the flexibility to find the best teachers, tutors, and mentors they can. They aren’t stuck with whatever teacher they end up with at conventional school. True educational customization!

You did concede there are some families doing it well and you knew of some homeschoolers in college who had “very tremendous academic success.”  I am thankful for our freedom in homeschooling and agree with you that “it’s up to families if they want to take a homeschool approach.” Homeschoolers, in my view, are by far the most entrepreneurial segment of the U.S. education system, and homeschooling is superior to any public or private school when done well. Nothing beats the level of customization homeschooling parents can offer their children with all that is available to us today.

Respectfully,

The Contemporary Homeschooler

You may also be interested in:

Homeschooling is the Smartest Way to Teach Kids in the 21st Century According to Business Insider

Benefits of Experiential Learning

Academic Scheduling for More Experiential Learning Part One

Academic Scheduling for More Experiential Learning Part Two

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68 thoughts on “Open Letter to U.S. Education Secretary King Who Says Homeschoolers Would Be Better Off in Public Schools

  1. I totally agree that homeschooling is a great way to educate a child. Specialized teachers and parents teach the kids in an environment that is conducive to learning, and free from bells, lining up and communal eating. The vast majority of homeschoolers have no problem getting into college, and usually excell there.

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  2. It was a good article and I agree with it. My only thought is there are a great many states that are not as progressive as California or Florida in offering homeschool campuses and classes to our kids. I know moms in other states that struggle to find something other than a religious co-op or church group to put their child in for socialization. Some of us are amazingly blessed to have so much opportunity for our kids. But, the secretary’s point about socialization could be partially valid in many states and rural areas of America. His comments about our kid’s education is bunk. 🙂

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    1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I would love to hear from people in different states about what homeschool opportunities they have. You are right that California is amazing for homeschoolers. There are so many options that it can be a bit overwhelming as to decide what to do.

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      1. I moved from CA almost 2 years ago to NC. Have home schooled in both states. In CA I did find more charter school options that helped with with cost of home schooling, but in NC I have found more co-ops, activity groups, community opportunities and field trip options than I could have ever imagined. Our biggest issue is narrowing them down so we still have some time for “book work”. It does cost us a bit more out of pocket, but there are many opportunities.

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      2. Ashleigh, Thanks for sharing you experience in both CA and NC. Glad you found a thriving homeschool community there. It is awesome to hear about so many places with loads of activities for homeschoolers and the recurring theme of narrowing the activities down to find time for book work.

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      3. Alaska is a wonderful place to homeschool. The state will give you funds for each child enrolled in the sponsored homeschool programs. The opportunities are so vast and excellent for homeschooled kids in Alaska.

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      4. Oh wow! I did not know that Alaska offered funds. How much do they offer for each kid? Do they have campuses for those enrolled in the sponsored homeschool programs? I’d love to hear more about homeschooling in beautiful Alaska! Thanks for your comments.

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      5. Michigan is another great state to homeschool in. The state funds the co operative classes we take which are held at a public early learning center. Additionally, extracurricular classes they take off site like martial arts, dance gymnastics, horseback riding, fencing, and archery (to name a few) are also covered. I have a Kindergartner taking Self Sustainability, Cooking, Fencing, Ballet and Tumbling AND I have a 5th grader taking Photography, Robotics, Cooking and Jiu Jitsu…and it doesn’t cost me a dime. All the classes are mixed ages and very well prepared.

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      6. How awesome! Thanks for sharing. I did not realize Michigan offered educational funds. We have that in California, too. How does it work in Michigan? Here you join a charter school and usually meet with a teacher once/month. They offer up to $2600/year. You can still entirely customize your child’s education and do not need to teach to a test or follow state standards.

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      7. We live in Connecticut, so many opportunities here. The local museums have homeschool days. There are co-ops everywhere. We have groups that just focus on field trips. We have co-ops just for play dates. We have co-ops that have classes from preschool to teens with age appropriate classes in groups. 3 to 5 years then 6 to 8 years 9 to 12 years and 13 and up. There are classes like human anatomy and improve and dramatic geometry. engineering and rocketing. civil rights and CT history through artifacts.
        But more than that when our child is having an issue learning something in whatever subject we don’t have to stop at 45 minutes and begin the next class we can spend however much time we need on that and we can change it up. Let’s say it is math and fractions. we try doing it on paper and they don’t understand. We can then get out a cookbook and go to the kitchen and talk about fractions there sometimes hands on help. or we can take paper and cut it up. or use money. and we can stay on it for as long as it takes.
        This is something my niece said to me, she goes to public school. She had trouble learning a new thing in math class and she was crying because she was still having trouble with her homework and I said forget about it for a while and she said she couldn’t because the next day in school they were going to learn the next part of this and if she didn’t learn the first part now she would never learn the next part tomorrow. As homeschoolers, we would never put this kind of stress on our child if they didn’t learn it today we would go over it again or skip that and come back later.
        The other day a few of us parents stopped and just looked around and were astounded by the gentleness of most of the children. There were teens and tweens stopping and helping the little ones and the little ones were not afraid of the older children they would walk over and ask for assistance. And it was given freely. We went to a homeschool event at a local parkour sports place called Soarin indoors. One little girl, about 6 or 7, was having trouble walking on the slackline. My 10-year-old son stopped what he was doing and helped her by patiently teaching her how to do it. Afterward, her mom came over to me and my son to say thank you so much to my son. I was very proud of course but thought that is the way homeschooled kids are. They learned that way from when they were little and older kids helped them with patience and kindness and even if that was the only thing they learned from homeschooling. What a better world we are creating. Homeschooling is by far the best way to teach children.

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    2. We have many options here in medium-sized town South Louisiana. There are multiple (secular, religious and no one cares) co-ops, classes and groups for our homeschooled kids. I’ve found my kids are able to make stronger bonds with their friends once they are out of the traditional classroom setting. By volunteering to teach classes, I have had the added benefit of gaining friends as well. So, homeschool has been a socialization win for our family.

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      1. Awesome!!! Glad there are a good variety of options in South Louisiana. Love that part of the country–the food is the best! I also agree that being in a co-op and teaching classes is a wonderful way to meet amazing friends. Thanks for sharing.

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    3. Homeschoolers in states that are not as “progressive” as California and Florida, those who do not have as many opportunities that are not church related, and/or those who are homeschooling in rural areas are still perfectly able to homeschool their children. Please do not draw a line of division within the homeschooling community by saying things like, “His comments about OUR kid’s education is bunk,” as though his comments are valid when it comes to those other (and implied, lesser) homeschoolers. Homeschooling parents can make even the most challenging situations work for the good of their children. All of our rights should be protected. If we allow the government to question some because they live in a rural area, they will question others- perhaps even those in California or Florida.

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      1. I can imagine that rural areas have a special type of beauty for homeschoolers with so much nature to explore and play in! My dad grew up in a rural area and I love how they ran freely through the forest, swam in the creek and much, much more. That is an awesome kind of freedom that many kids don’t get to enjoy anymore. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

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      2. You know, when we first started homeschooling, we were the epitome of unsocialized homeschoolers. We were the only homeschoolers in our rural county and my kids were the only ones in our tiny church. No co-op, limited curriculum choices, limited opportunities for friendships as we were somewhat shunned by our community once we started homeschooling. But we spent so much time as a family reading and playing and learning together, and the kids went outside with their dad a lot and got a lot of nature time which was unstructured by me. I was not great with the hands on projects as shown in all the photos in this article. I guess I was not a modern homeschooler. But my four older kids who experienced this are best friends and all doing very well as adults. My two youngsters got more like what is displayed in this article, but you know what? I prefer the first way and feel sad they did not experience it. Tailoring learning environments etc is definitely an advantage to homeschooling. But the greatest advantage, in my opinion, is spending your time with family that loves you and wants what is best for you. That can never be duplicated in the classroom.

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    4. Actually socialization in rural areas isn’t any harder than urban ones and in someways is even easier. 4-H, other clubs, homeschool co-ops all still exist in rural and semi-rural areas as well.

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      1. I’m about to begin homeschooling in rural Montana, and it’s definitely more challenging than in Tennessee where I was homeschooled. There are no co-ops, activities for early elementary are very few… Thankfully, homeschooling is growing in my town, but if I want it, I’m going to have to start it myself.

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      2. My university had a saying: “Build it and they will come.” Wishing you the best launching a homeschool group in your area if you choose to do so. Perhaps if you start a great program then more families on the fence about homeschooling will join you! Good luck and thanks for sharing.

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  3. Great article and very insightful! I am Mom to 9 forever homeschoolers who have proven themselves in college, business, and throughout life! Our last 3 are almost finished and although I’m going to miss the incredible lifestyle when all are graduated, I am so thankful we chose this route when our firstborn approached school age. Thanks for addressing this in a straightforward and positive manner!

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  4. You wanted feedback from various states, so wanted to comment that there is no shortage of homeschooling opportunities in St. Louis, Missouri. Our local libraries, history and science museums, children’s museum, art museum and more all have programs or special days for homeschoolers. There are classes offered through a wide range of co-ops, churches, college campuses, away-from-home schools that are just for homeschoolers, and much more. There are several performing arts and circus arts schools, dance and gymnastics opportunities, and endless sports. You can even find classes for elective subjects like filmmaking, computer programming, Lego robotics, etc. Our co-op has had tons of fun and educational events such as touring a radio station, bakery, and fire safety program, archery events, gymnastics play days, holiday parties, talent shows, pumpkin patch field trips and prom. They’ve done fund raisers with garage sales and kids’ craft fairs. There are opportunities for choir, drama, gentleman’s club, geocaching, nature walks, camping, Home Ec, etiquette classes, art, and the list goes on. We are blessed to have an abundance of activities to choose from and most moms I talk to only have one complaint: It’s hard to actually get in the book work time because our schedules are just too full! A great problem to have.

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  5. I have been a homeschool parent for 25+ years. Some of my children have also attended private & public schools, for periods of time, prior to their completion of high school. I have had children attend public and private colleges as well. In addressing the socialization issue, it has never been my experience that there is a problem related to a shortage of opportunities for extra curricular activities & social encounters, quite the opposite – most families (our own included) have had to scale down many times, to provide the ‘best yes’ for our children’s & our families time. Some of the things my own (5 children) have participated in; Co-ops with other home educators; Science, Sewing, History, Art Appreciation, Lit Circle, speech class & field study. The local 4-H & FFA programs in our state (Oregon) and our local area are strong & many homeschool students find opportunities to learn skills in Animal husbandry, Agri-business, horticulture, flower arranging, pre- veterinary care, money-management, leadership & public speaking, not to mention; robotics, photography, cooking, sewing, and a myriad of other options. As an FFA/4-H member students will keep records, serve in the community, learn & work with students of various backgrounds & ages. Our public schools & many of our private schools offer options for attendance in classes both standard & elective. Sports & clubs are also available through these institutions. In the private sector; Music lessons (individual) & band/orchestra, theatre, competitive sports (Little League), swim lessons & teams, parks & rec., dance studio’s, wood shop, oil painting, pottery, sign language, foreign language & more! These may be offered for a small fee from other parents or purchased in the community from the private sector. Opportunities for social interaction also occur through Churches & community organizations; AWANA club, Scouts, American Girl groups, or American Heritage groups, to name a few. Volunteer opportunities at the local library, museums, boys & girls clubs, soup kitchens & senior centers also offer exposure to multiple age and economic levels. Homeschool students have more time available to serve in their communities and benefit both from the experience of mentors, and the value of investing in others.
    The most unfortunate reality of all is that ALL CHILDREN CANNOT BE HOME EDUCATED. There will always be a need for other education options. The best thing Home schoolers can bring to the table is in the ‘model’ .. of what IS working.

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  6. You know, when we first started homeschooling, we were the epitome of unsocialized homeschoolers. We were the only homeschoolers in our rural county and my kids were the only ones in our tiny church. No co-op, limited curriculum choices, limited opportunities for friendships as we were somewhat shunned by our community once we started homeschooling. But we spent so much time as a family reading and playing and learning together, and the kids went outside with their dad a lot and got a lot of nature time which was unstructured by me. I was not great with the hands on projects as shown in all the photos in this article. I guess I was not a “contemporary homeschooler”. But my four older kids who experienced this are best friends and all doing very well as adults. My two youngsters got more like what is displayed in this article, but you know what? I prefer the first way and feel sad they did not experience it. Tailoring learning environments etc is definitely an advantage to homeschooling. But the greatest advantage, in my opinion, is spending your time with family that loves you and wants what is best for you. That can never be duplicated in the classroom.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Awesome writing! Thank you sincerely. I am sharing widely. Hope this actually gets to the Secretary. Would love to see a reply from him, in the form of an apology!

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  8. Three comments. First, I would like us to change this dialog to not being about homeschool vs. public school rather it is about education. It is a choice. Every child is different. Every need if different. Second, 21st century opportunities are everpresent-Children are not bound to states or countries when they homeschool. In addition to learning alongside contemporaries of all ages, and all races, they learn about all cultures with vast experiences and studies. My children interact regularly with other students from all other the world. My children also take subjects online with peers from up to 25 different states at a time. On vacations the children participate in Shakespeare Theatre. My son just dug a pond by hand because he wanted the satisfaction of doing it by hand even though someone offered to use his backhoe. On weekends when many children are glued to televisions, running from sport to sport, or gaming, my children are building from scratch their own telescopes, they are learning from a trade alongside a mentor, they are building hydroponic gardens that grow food with little water needed, or they are observing birds and insects then building robots that move with natural grace. I listen to endless hours of technology problem solving by my kids who easily take apart toys, appliances, and technologies just to create something better. When I tell them the budget does not allow for a gadget from the store they figure out how to build one. They fail often, but to a greater extent they succeed. I teach them the scientific method so they can replicate their results. They read meaningful books about societies, history, technologies, and languages. They challenge my ways of things and learning.

    It is not homeschoolers I would worry about. Instead, I would concern myself with American’s and policy makers who attack choices and cause more divisiveness in a country that was built on its individuality and its values. We do not have only one choice when it comes to education-We are either free to choose responsibly or we are not. That premise holds true in all choices especially in education because great minds will one day lead every industry and every community in this land. My role is to encourage responsible learning not interfere with it. How many American’s lost their jobs or investments and had to start all over again? Learning is lifelong. It doesn’t happen just in brick buildings or at desks. It happens in the stars, in the dirt, at tbe theatre, through distance education, and in a conversations. It happens with peers and it happens when alone. Education is not a place we go to learn. Education is an ever expanding universe of opportunities. We are all teachers to children if we choose to pass on our trades, crafts, and professions. The children are teachers to us as well as they master the subjects they integrate well when they are not prohibited and tbey are encouraged to understand and value their freedoms.

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  9. Absolutely love your response to his comments. I am still trying to figure out how rapid instruction at public school is better than helping kids learn at their own rate and getting to investigate further the things that truly interest them. Even when I taught in the classroom that drove me nuts.
    Sharing this everywhere and often. I hope he gets to see it.

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  10. Spot on! We are in the midst of a 3 week European trip. Our first. For months before this trip, we studied about the countries we are visiting, the rich history, the various monuments. During our travels, we spent hours with an archeologist touring the British Museum where he brought history to life like no classroom will ever be able to do. We toured the Colosseum and Palatino as well as the ruins of Pompeii. We have a new appeciation for the preservation of ancient ruins. We climbed the steps of the Leaning Tower of Pisa today after already learning about the Tower’s history. We are living a very rich educational experience all during a 3 week family trip. For us this trip is once in a lifetime. But these experiences for our children keep their passion for learning burning bright!

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    1. What a rich and beautiful experience your family is having, Linda. These memories will be seared into your family’s head. I completely agree with you that it makes travels and field trips more meaningful when we learn more about them ahead of time. Excellent job stimulating a love of learning for your family. Thanks for sharing!!!

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  11. My goodness….this is making me wonder if I should consider homeschooling my children instead of sending them to the private Christian school that we plan to send them to. They are 3 years old (next month) & 7 months old. Our pediatrician is blown away by how quickly & easily my oldest learns. She’s so intelligent & I’m afraid that sticking her in a classroom will only slow her down. Hmmm….it seems like such an overwhelming responsibility. How do I know if I have what it takes? Any advice on where to begin the decision process?

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    1. Jenny, It is great that you have time to think about it and plan. I think most parents have what it takes if they are willing to research best options for their kids. You care more than anyone about what is best for your kids because you are their parents. I suggest you get in touch with a homeschool group in your area and come to some of their events. You can pick the brains of moms and get a feel for what it is like. I have several friends who left private Christian schools to homeschool. They thought they could give their kids a better education at a fraction of the cost.

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      1. Thank you! That’s, actually, a great idea! There are several homeschool moms at church & I can ask them about groups they attend. I’m going to start right away so that, if I choose homeschooling for them, we can be ahead of the game. Also, I agree with some other posters….bullying is a big concern of mine. I was bullied, myself, for a short time. It became physical but came to an abrupt end when I was attacked….since I had just gotten my black belt in martial arts & had no problem defending myself. Sad that it resorted to that, though.

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  12. I just thought I would share about Wyoming: we live in a mid sized town, however, we are home to the University of Wyoming. The university provides lots of opportunities for learning (my child is 6 and in 3rd grade, so the opportunities start at an early age). There are also the groups others have already listed… my daughter does dance, art, sewing, piano… if you look around there are a lot of opportunities to be found. When we first started our journey I was worried that the opportunities were limited, but we are in the same place of having to say “no” to some things!
    I would also like to add that homeschooling is so very flexible and can be made to fit any need: we own our own family run/operated business at which I answer phones and do the bookkeeping. I homeschool at work; my kids are learning business first hand while also learning the traditional school essentials; not to mention a great work ethic! As long as you have the conviction that homeschooling is what is best for your children there is no obstacle that can’t be overcome!
    Being a homeschooling mom has been one of the best decisions I have made, both for myself and my children. We are still “babies” in the homeschooling community, but I can only see our experiences improving with the years! Good luck to you all

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    1. Karli, Thanks for sharing about your experiences and opportunities in Wyoming. It is so wonderful to hear about the diversity of experiences for homeschoolers all around the nation in towns of varying sizes. I also LOVE that your kids are learning about business. That is so practical and truly beneficial in the “real world.” Keep up the great work, mama!

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  13. There is another reason for homeschooling children. Avoiding being bullied at school. A child needs the opportunity to learn at her own rate of speed, without(!) the distraction and fear of bullying. Unfortunately, bullying is alive and well in our public schools. It has been for several generations. And there is NO positive outcome for the one being bullied. Homeschooling allows teaching a child how to behave responsibly among his peers, while learning at her own rate, with the freedom of expression possible outside the classroom.

    I must add, there are also so-called “homeschoolers” whose parents keep them home and isolated from public venues for nefarious purposes, including all kinds of abuse. Our county’s legal system is challenged by this practice, and policing it is difficult to impossible. These children must be found and treated appropriately by the county or state.

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    1. Thank you for your comments, Linda. I am proud of the kids I know in my homeschool circle who are welcoming of all kids. A friend recently started homeschooling after her son has been in public school for several years and had been teased about his stature. She told me he is so happy to no longer be called names. I think kids are so joyful about learning and having fun together that it does not even cross their mind to bully. I also think the parents take a lot of time to train their kids to be kind.

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